Are You a Mac or a PC?

In 1995 I was ten years old. Back then, Mac’s were for artists and scientists while Windows-based PCs were for enterprise and gamers. The Internet hadn’t taken off yet, though it was starting to make waves. And mobile computing was really a joke. You could find laptops in the wild and many people liked them, but by today’s standards, you were lugging a fragile piece of plastic around that had to be babied if you didn’t want to lose files or worse.

When I was twenty in 2005, the Internet was exciting. Mobile computing was fun and music players were stealing attention away from desktop work stations. But one thing had stuck with us from the eighties through the nineties and into the new century: desktop Windows personal computers were mainstream and Apple’s Mac line was a niche for artists, a few professionals and loyal fans that valued Apple’s platform.

But the majority of our American culture was a PC culture. You had to have passion and nerve to use a Mac and tell PC users that it was a better experience. It was difficult to prove that the Mac was useful for anyone that wanted an alternative from the Windows world. Apple’s playful Mac vs. PC commercials helped lighten the debate between fandoms but they couldn’t prove that the Mac was a PC’s equal or superior. Of course, if you were creative and liked the arts, the Macs were often more suitable. But that hardly made the Mac platform a good one for everyone.

I have always enjoyed and worked on a Mac. I learned how to type, keep a schedule, browse the web, and all the other essential computery tasks on Macs. In fact, it was with Macs in high school that I learned video production, photoshop, and how to write a blog. It wasn’t just the prosumer or amateur that got things done on a Mac. Movies were made with Final Cut Pro. The Adobe products started with Macs. A minority of professionals got real work and play done with a Mac in spite of fierce competition.

And a lot changed between 2005 when I was twenty and 2015 when I was thirty.

The Post PC Era

You know the rest of the story. The iPod was such a hot product that Apple looked for ways to capitalize on handheld computers. The iPhone was the real winner; so much so that the success of the iPod was dwarfed and all but forgotten.

The iPhone stole the limelight from Macs and PCs as well. Sure, most of us work on a notebook computer or a desktop for the majority of our desk jobs, but smartphones quickly became the most personal of computers. If the platform wars were objective, we’d call iPhones and Android sets our PCs.

Even though the debate between Mac and Windows PC still lingers, for the most part nobody cares whether you get work done on one platform or the other. If you’re industry is well supported, you have credible applications and you know how to use them, nothing stands in your way. The Mac has been popularized and recognized as the Window’s machine’s equal not because of its own merit but because the iPod, iPhone and iPad convinced the market that Apple was a legitimate mainstream computer company.

And while PCs remain important, they’ve taken the backseat. Smartphones drive the computer industry to the point that innovation doesn’t really seem to happen for notebooks and desktops anymore. Sure, a new high definition display technology comes out every few years, and battery technology in mice has improved, and the app interface for that OS has flattened, but where’s the innovation? Where’s the new tech that makes a state-of-the-art Mac or PC indispensable?

What’s your PC?

Mac and PC users now have it relatively easy. The controversy is over and the dust has settled. You needn’t fear that your platform will fade out of existence or that the industry’s titan computer company will be bankrupt when market demand plummets. Or do you?

Apple is the company I watch closely. Many a Mac user has noticed that Apple doesn’t update their computers annually or even every other year. Some have given up hope on different Mac lines, like the Mac Pro. Perhaps Apple will cut the assembly line completely because… Well, no one is really sure why Apple would do such a thing, but no one understands why Apple has been so very slow to update their computers to simply maintain their market value. And, oddly enough, Macs are still selling.

And in spite of the Mac’s success, iPhones and iPads have received so much attention that the Mac feels abandoned. Apple’s marketing has suggested that the iPad Pro is this generation’s personal computer. Is it possible that Macs really have been marginalized? As a matter of fact, I’ve been writing this post on my iPad Pro with a great keyboard cover. It practically feels like a MacBook at times (though it clearly isn’t one). Does an iPad Pro surpass Mac Pro standards? In some ways, yes.

And even though we all know that a ‘personal computer’ is simple a computer one uses primarily for his own pleasure or work, in the past, the term typically represented the Windows’ computer platform. Macs were Macs, not to be confused for PCs. This was an ambiguous terminology convention that we’ve accepted for decades. And in recent years it seems that more people have finally understood the terms. Macs and Windows computers are both PCs.

But what is a computer, really? Isn’t your iPhone your most personal computer and your Apple Watch your most intimate compu—um, device? Because platforms are more complex than they were ten years ago the factions have changed. It’s not really a debate whether you’re a Mac or PC but whether you’re a Mac or an iPhone/iPad user. Or a PC and an Android.

Cross platforming

Earlier this year, I took a client that wants me to use their computers, servers, and offices to produce videos (This is why I’ve been preoccupied and blogging less). Theirs is an all Windows-based production studio.

When I wake up, I stop my iPhone’s alarm. I carry it to the kitchen listening to podcasts and use a coffee recipe timer while I get ready in the morning. Then I slip on my Apple Watch to track my activity. I carry my 12” MacBook to the office just in case I need to respond to my design clients. All of my design work is done on macOS with Adobe CC. At the desk at the video company, I’m mostly using a powerful Windows 10 desktop editing station. It’s very “truck-like.” When I return home, I use my Mac to serve my design clients. Then in the evening, I spend most of my time on my iPad and iPhone—listening to podcasts and music, watching YouTube videos or reading a book, or following a recipe in Paprika.

I don’t have complete control of the Windows PC at the office. I’m the only person using it but it’s setup the way the administrator orchestrates the business. I’m accustom to the keyboard shortcuts and basics of the interface, though I hardly spend anytime tinkering in the system or learning new tricks specifically related to Windows. I spend a good deal of time in iCloud.com writing notes or scheduling on the PC.

In all my cross-platforming, the one observation I’ve made is that desktop computers are really boring. They are old school—powerful work engines that serve business objectives. There isn’t a lot of innovation in the interface, app features or the hardware. If you were born in the nineties and missed the Mac Versus PC Era, you might wonder what was all the fuss about?

Hello again

Apple’s announced an event for October 27. Everyone has good reason to believe that they are introducing the next generation MacBook Pro and then some. New Macs are long overdue and I’m looking forward to what they have to reveal. I wasn’t impressed by the rumored MacBook Pro with touch screen key(s), but I’m sure Cue and Schiller could sell it to me.

I hope this puts Mac fans’ minds at ease; maybe they would indicate that not only is this a refresh but a sign of growth in the Mac platform to come.

Impressions of iOS 10

I started using an iPhone with iOS 4 on a black iPhone 4. The system oozed with skeuomorphism, animations, buttons and shadows (those were the good old days). It was a truly revolutionary time to start using Apple’s products.

I was very apprehensive about design changes that came with iOS 7. Jony Ive offered us a new paint job on the tried-and-true interface. If you wanted simplicity it felt right. If you were familiar with the intuitive tricks of skeuomorphism you were probably frustrated. iOS 7 often seemed incomplete like Jony took simplicity too seriously. New interface buttons were just colored text. The invisible menus of 3D Touch added even more complexity.

I wasn’t thrilled with many of the iterative improvements that were to follow because Apple wasn’t serving power user’s interests. Apple changed the interface at a snail’s pace for the benefit of everyday users. As an app and operating system design enthusiast, I knew that iOS 7 through iOS 9 were all transitional phases for a more mature iteration that would eventually follow.

Finally, eventually has come. iOS 10 is a refined treatment of Apple’s flat design trend.

Uniform consistency and maturity

Generally, the colors, layers, shadows, animations and other design styles of iOS 10’s interface are welcome. The lock screen takes on new features and functionality. Control Center spreads out and sports new detailed settings. Spotlight search and notifications aren’t that much better than they were in iOS 9, but they weren’t that bad in iOS 9.

There are two controversial features Apple introduced in iOS 10. I know several users that dislike the all-new glanceable widgets, and others are understandably confused by the lock screen. How you unlock the phone from the lock screen varies a little depending on which model iPhone you use.

I like the glanceable widgets about as much as I like Apple Watch complications. I take advantage of them but I don’t need them. If Jony decided tomorrow that they had to go I wouldn’t be upset. I don’t know that I or anyone else has a legitimate reason to criticize the widgets screen, but haters are gonna hate.

The lock screen is confusing. Your best bet for a care-free relationship with your phone is to have a device with good Touch ID. If you can forget everything you thought you knew, it makes a lot of sense on iPhone 7. Apple thinks the best way to use the phone is to raise the device to wake it up, glance at the lock screen and the widgets for notifications and updates, then proceed to the home screen by pressing the home button. I’ve had my iPhone 7 for a little over three weeks and this lock screen is starting to feel natural. I think I would struggle if my iPhone didn’t wake when I raised it.

Maturing a design interface is very difficult across multiple devices with different features. If you want to use what Apple has in mind for both their software and hardware, you need to get on the iOS 10/iPhone 7 bandwagon sooner or later. If you don’t mind that the system took two steps forward and one step back, then you’ll be happy with iOS 10 on older iPhones.

Music playability

I use Apple Music because I have an iTunes library with 3,000 purchased and downloaded (or CD ripped) tracks. In spite of Apple Music’s bugs and sometimes confusing design, I didn’t want to abandon ship for a third party streaming service. I don’t want to start my music library again. Yes, there were times I wanted to scratch my eyes out while using iOS 9’s Apple Music app, but my library wasn’t riddled with bugs. And, somewhat surprisingly, every time I wanted to play my music or find something to stream, Apple Music worked.

But iOS 10’s Music app still leaves much to be desired. Apple redesigned the interface since iOS 9. Now, it looks a little like Pinterest. It’s the first complete shift away from anything that reminded me of the iPod Classic’s interface. I’m not opposed to the bold text, large tappable buttons or the bouncing cover art. I think that it’s a friendly and usable version.

It’s too bad that controls to shuffle or repeat tracks are hidden below the fold of the playback screen. Maybe Apple’s designers were catering to the iPhone’s plus sizes when they were crafting the app?

If I had one wish come true

Siri is really useful when she wants to be and the rest of the time she’s a nuisance. I would love to use Siri all day long if she would understand me at least 80% of the time. Apple and Amazon have introduced clever features using Siri and Alexa but both leave much to be desired.

What it comes down to for me is their conversational language hiccups. I believe people would make great use of Siri if she understood us. Already, Siri can manage our email and calendar, retrieve notes and recipes, start music and set alarms… But with every feature, you have to be incredibly exact in how you give Siri the verbal command or she won’t understand.

Since we’ve had Siri for a few years now, and on countless occasions She’s let us down when she couldn’t understand us, people are giving up hope that she ever will follow our commands. Friends tell me that they don’t use Siri, or that if they do, it’s only rarely for one or two tasks. Given her potential but the ridiculous learning curve it takes to use Siri effectively, I’m surprised that Apple promotes Siri as a hallmark feature of the iPhone when they haven’t introduced significant improvements since she was first added to iOS.

Top Brew has Joined Night Owl FM

Top Brew was the first podcast to join the Night Owl network. TJ Draper and I started Night Owl to simplify and consolidate our podcast productions. Two years in the making, we are very happy to see our enterprise take flight. Now, we can focus more attention on creating content.

The first independent episode of Top Brew was released January 14, 2015. Episode #72 released September 12 was the first podcast released on Night Owl.

Podcasting is a tricky medium. Our goal with Top Brew has always been to share tips, tricks and great caffeinated conversation with the coffee enthusiasts community. If people liked the show and we grew, it would be awesome. And if our needs changed and we joined a network, that was cool, too.

If you happen across this post because you’re a coffee fiend interested in making a guest appearance on Top Brew, let us know. I’m scheduling two episodes monthly and we need to start a conversation a couple weeks in advance of recording. You’re welcome to share your brewing methods, favorite roaster stories, recommend a cool coffee device or maybe something else that comes to you’re interested to discuss.

Top Brew #69: Flavor Molecules

It’s estimated that cold brew is now a $2 billion business in the United States. With that in mind, we took a little more time to discuss it. I’ve noticed that I’m actually taking a liking to it, and it could potentially solve some of the issues we’ve raised in past episodes.

Techtonic 56: Bringing the Power of Applescript to Mortals

In this week’s episode, Joshua is joined by our special guest, David Sparks, to discuss macOS and iOS automation using the apps Hazel and Workflow.

Since this was WWDC week and I was at the beach with my family, we recorded this episode a week in advance. And, as it turns out, I came down with the flu and allergy problems before we recorded, so Joshua took over things.

The WWDC announcements for macOS and iOS are exciting, but Apple didn’t offer new automation solutions. Going forward, apps like Hazel and Workflow are still very relevant. If you want to take a deep dive into them, check out Sparks’ field guides, some of the best.

Speed to watchOS Can’t Get Here Fast Enough

Recently on Techtonic, I said that the main improvement I wanted to see in watchOS 3 was speed enhancement. Today, Apple promised they’ll deliver.

My concern has been that everyone with an Apple Watch has said it’s sluggish. watchOS 2 feels very much like a state-of-the-art operating system for 2010, and that’s a problem. We don’t have a good reason to wait on our watches when we can perform the same actions 10x faster with any other device.

If you walk into an Apple Store today and test drive a watch on display, it will run much faster than the watch on your wrist. The disparity is so noticeable to me that I’m surprised others haven’t complained. I think it’s unintentionally hypocritical that their model on the retail floor is obviously superior to the watch they’ll sell you.

With watchOS 3, I’m hopeful that the speed I always wanted is finally arriving for my first generation watch, not just Watch 2 hardware at some later date.

Joe Darnell

Joe is a UI and graphic designer with prior experience as the creative director for three media-based businesses. Joe’s passionate about web design and graphic design with about 15 years of experience in the media industry. Additionally, Joe is the host of the Top Brew and Techtonic podasts, both featured on iTunes.

The Best Wallpaper of OS X

Mac OS X has always offered enchanting background images. I’ve been very fond of Apple’s blue arches, northern lights, galaxies and mountain terrains.

One of the newest stands out from the rest. It’s available in System Preferences, named El Capitan 2. It’s of Yosemite National Park at night, revealing an array of starry night lights above the mountain peaks.

Drop camera, walk away.

This, I contend, is the most faithful photographic representation of OS X’s default wallpaper themes wrapped into one. It features lots of blue (which reflects the early Aqua themed wallpapers of Tiger, Jaguar and the like), starry skies and nature all in one.

Aqua Blue for Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger

Leopard Aurora for Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard

Andromeda for Mac OS X 10.7 Lion

El Capitan for OS X 10.11 El Capitan

512 Pixels shared this excellent walk down memory lane. I had all of them at one point.

Joe Darnell

Joe is a UI and graphic designer with prior experience as the creative director for three media-based businesses. Joe’s passionate about web design and graphic design with about 15 years of experience in the media industry. Additionally, Joe is the host of the Top Brew and Techtonic podasts, both featured on iTunes.

Techtonic 55: ‘Apple, Save My Marriage’

This week on the tech show, Joshua and I are joined by our special guest, Sean Doran, eager to discuss our wish lists for iOS, macOS and watchOS. WWDC is just around the corner, so you never know. Some Apple developer might be listening and crank out all the new stuff we have in mind. We can dream.

RWT 100th Episode Special: Why We Are All Here

A couple days ago, my friends at ‘Reel World Theology’ released episode #100. It’s a pleasure to podcast with Fizz and the gang, when the occasion arrises. I can be heard on a review for Cinderella (2015) and Unbroken (2014) in their archive.

Around 02:20:00(!) into this episode, you’ll hear me. Other than that part, it’s really good. Some down-to-earth people come together and share film insights and passions.

I give Fizz a hard time about how good ‘Reel World Theology’ is, because I like it so much and I don’t want him to know. Check out a review in the archive for a movie you like, and give the show a listen.

Top Brew 66: Syringe for Elephants

On Friday’s episode of the coffee show, Eric and I report on my recent trip to Counter Culture Coffee of Atlanta. It was great to meet Ben Helfen, slurp and spit some Ethiopian, and meet a handful of coffee enthusiasts that appreciate the craft.

Also in this episode, we discuss our experiences with friends, family, and coworkers that have been influenced by our coffee standards. It’s not like we want to become craft coffee apologists, but we kind of already are.

My thanks to Magic Coffee Truck for sponsoring Top Brew. Get made-from-scratch coffee toffee, choco-dipped coffeemallows, and more one-of-a-kind edibles! Use discount code MAGICTOME20 to get 20% off your purchase. I recommend you try the cold brew(s).

Have a great Memorial Day! ☕️

4 Ways to Turn Customer Empathy into a USP

Good advice from my coffee friend, Sharon Turner, of Magic Coffee Truck. She’s thought of ‘four ways you can bring customer service empathy to the forefront of your business model’:

  1. Create a Coffee Community
  2. Serve Local, But Don’t Forget Vanilla
  3. Consider Customer Suggestions
  4. Share Your Vision

Read her article at Perfectly Daily Grind.

/Source

Joe Darnell

Joe is a UI and graphic designer with prior experience as the creative director for three media-based businesses. Joe’s passionate about web design and graphic design with about 15 years of experience in the media industry. Additionally, Joe is the host of the Top Brew and Techtonic podasts, both featured on iTunes.

On Criticism, Cynicism & Sharpening Your Gut Instinct

Time and time again, creative people are given two pieces of advice: (1) Listen to your critics and seek feedback, but also (2) Ignore your critics and follow your intuition. Clearly, there’s a powerful contradiction here in need of reconciliation.

The article has great advice for anyone wrestling with feedback.

Techtonic 54: Redesign All the Things

This week on Techtonic, with our special guest, Lee Peterson, I discussed potential changes to Apple Music in iOS 10. Then, since we were already talking about interfaces, we review Instagram’s app refresh.

I think that Apple Music still shows promise. I use it regularly for reasons we highlight in the show. This said, I’m greatly annoyed that the music in iTunes on my iMac, MacBook and iPhone don’t match. I don’t know why the libraries don’t match. Sigh

On the flip side, the changes to Instagram are more than welcome. Instagram’s app icon changes how we feel about it, but what you’ll find inside is the app we know and love in black-and-white. The enhancements to Search and Explore are handy.

What if it had no ports?

A great amount of contention surrounds the MacBook’s one port. Technically, there are two if you include the headphone jack, which is about one more than I think Apple wanted to include. The problem for users, however, is that there isn’t the same number of ports on the state-of-the-art MacBook as there are on the tried-and-true MacBook Air.

More is better, right? Many want what they know and love about their computer of yesteryear with the feel of a sleek minimalistic aluminum body of today. The MacBook Air doesn’t cut the mustard in 2016. We want something thinner that’s just as powerful for everyday use. The MacBook Air’s ports give it a definite advantage over the MacBook One (that’s what some of us like to call it).

Let’s ask ourselves what does Apple want to do with the MacBook? As it concerns the one USB-C port, they have this to say on the product’s page:

As long as we were including a port for charging your MacBook, we wanted to make sure it was the most advanced and versatile one available. The USB-C port puts just about everything you need in a port all in one place. This amazing port provides charging, speedy USB 3 data transfer, and video output in a reversible design that’s one-third the size of a USB 3 port, giving you the flexibility to easily connect your favorite devices.

I can hear Eddy Cue saying that paragraph from the stage of an Apple keynote. The important quotation to note here is “As long as we were including a port for charging your MacBook.” Think about that.

I own and use a MacBook every day. In fact, it’s my primary Mac. If I have the choice between a MacBook or my iMac or iPad, I’ll probably go with the MacBook. I like most characteristics about it.

The port is an issue for me from time to time. I’ve often wondered why I have technical issues with it working with external display. I also wonder (at times) how I’m going to get two USB microphones connected to my MacBook. In the end, I always find a way to make it work. Even if it’s not what I would originally have in mind, I make it work. I’ve not had to compromise on more than how I would make a feature work. In the end, everything works, somehow. (I feel the need to stress that last point before I hit on my real point for this post.)

I have a theory. I think Apple knew that they couldn’t get away with no ports, so they included one. The MacBook needs at least one port for charging. Since this is the case, they went ahead and gave this port other features, like support for USB-C and external displays. If it weren’t for the necessity of powering and charging the MacBook with this singular port, Apple would not have given the MacBook a port at all.

Does this bother you? The notion would probably bother most of us, but it’s ultimately what I believe we can expect from Apple. The day will come that Jony Ive will want no ports and find a way to make this work for one of his devices. When that day comes, many people will hate that Mac more than they ever hated the MacBook One.A great amount of contention surrounds the MacBook’s one port. Well, technically there are two if you include the headphone’s jack, which is about one more than I think Apple wanted to include. The problem for users, however, is that there isn’t the same number of ports on the state-of-the-art MacBook as there are on the tried-and-true MacBook Air.

More is better, right? Many want what they know and love about their computer with the feel of a sleek minimalistic aluminum body. The MacBook Air doesn’t cu the mustard anymore. We want something thin as well as powerful for everyday use, and the MacBook Air’s ports give it a definite advantage over the MacBook One (as some of us like to call it).

Let’s ask ourselves what does Apple want to do with the MacBook? As it concerns the one USB-C port, they have this to say on the product’s page:

As long as we were including a port for charging your MacBook, we wanted to make sure it was the most advanced and versatile one available. The USB-C port puts just about everything you need in a port all in one place. This amazing port provides charging, speedy USB 3 data transfer, and video output in a reversible design that’s one-third the size of a USB 3 port, giving you the flexibility to easily connect your favorite devices.

I own and use a MacBook every day. In fact, it’s my primary Mac. If I have the choice between a MacBook or my iMac or iPad, I’ll probably go with the MacBook. I like most characteristics about it.

But the port is an issue for me from time to time. I’ve often wondered why I have technical issues with it and my external display, or how I’m going to get two USB microphones connected to my MacBook. In the end, I always find a way to make it work, even if it’s not what I would originally have in mind, I make it work. I’ve not had to compromise on more than how I would make a feature work. In the end, everything works, somehow. (Just have to make that point before I hit on my real point for this post.)

I have a theory. I think Apple knew that they couldn’t get away with no ports, so they included one. The MacBooks needed at least one port for charging. Since this is the case, they went ahead and gave this port other features, like support for USB-C and external displays. But if it weren’t for the necessity of powering and charging the MacBook with this singular port, I think Apple would not have given the MacBook a port at all.

Does this bother you? The notion would probably bother most people, but it’s ultimately what I think we can expect of some future Mac. The day will come that Jony Ive will want no ports and find a way to make this work for one of his devices. When that day comes, many people will hate that Mac more than they ever hated the MacBook One.

Joe Darnell

Joe is a UI and graphic designer with prior experience as the creative director for three media-based businesses. Joe’s passionate about web design and graphic design with about 15 years of experience in the media industry. Additionally, Joe is the host of the Top Brew and Techtonic podasts, both featured on iTunes.

Techtonic 51: A Very Geeky Household Name

This week on Techtonic, special guest Daniel Jalkut and I discuss his app developer career. Daniel has been in the Apple community since the eighties, worked for Apple out of high school, studied music in college after leaving Apple, acquired MarsEdit as an independent developer… There’s so much that he’s done that is different from other tech professionals.

I learned a lot from our talk and it’s remolding my perspective on the Mac and iOS platforms. I believe this is one of our best discussions on the show to date.

My huge thanks to our sponsor, Focus app, The simplest tool for writing task lists, marking them complete, and focusing on real work using the Pomodoro Technique from any of your Apple devices.

Top Brew 61: Don’t Flush Out Your Lightbulbs

This week in coffee, why do you get an upset stomach and heartburn? We look at why this is caused. Hint: It’s not the coffee’s acid that disturbs you.

We discuss ways to counteract coffee/stomach irritation, because we don’t want chlorogenic and gastric acid to separate you from a good cup'a joe.

Secondly, we taste test some RaceTrac coffee, from the local gas station. All things considered, convenient coffee from any station in America makes more than its worth. Why is gas station coffee big business in the modern world? We discuss.

My thanks to our sponsors:

Magic Coffee Truck: Handcrafted coffee treats from the one-of-a-kind coffee laboratory. Use discount code MAGICALLYCAFFEINATED to get 20% off any order over 10 dollars.

Thrasher Coffee: Freshly roasted, small-batch coffees shipped to your doorstep. Use TOPBREW to receive 25% off of your first coffee purchase.

Top Brew #60: Hidden Meaning in Every Mug

Aaron Dowd ‘The Podcast Dude’ of the Seanwes Network is our special guest this week. We discuss his brewing ritual: where he squeezes in 5+ brews a day on the AeroPress, how he blends it together with butter and milk, why he’s mostly using inexpensive beans, and generally how coffee fuels Aaron’s mindful lifestyle.

My thanks to our Top Brew sponsors:

Magic Coffee Truck: Handcrafted coffee treats from the one-of-a-kind coffee laboratory. Use discount code MAGICALLYCAFFEINATED to get 20% off any order over 10 dollars.

Thrasher Coffee: Freshly roasted, small-batch coffees shipped to your doorstep. Use TOPBREW to receive 25% off of your first coffee purchase.

Techtonic #49: The Man in the White Gloves

No technology show is complete till the hosts and guests describe their iPhone home screens. Joshua Peiffer, Micah Pogue and I discuss several of the best apps on ours and the philosophies we’ve applied to our app layout organization.

I want to note that the News app is missing on my iPhone. I don’t recall deleting it, and since that’s not a possibility in the first place… I’m going to assume that God took it off of my phone, because he loves me.

Top Brew #59: Coffee and Computers

Eric and I discussed three things that all have something in common. First, we talked about hands-on coffee and what’s lost in the experience of k-cups. Second, we reviewed the cupping process at Starbucks’ headquarters.

Lastly, we review a cup of Dunkin Donuts coffee. I know you’ve all been waiting to find out what we make of them, because ‘American Runs On Dunkin’. Shouldn’t ignore Dunkin.

Techtonic #48: Don Draper’s iPad

In a Part 2 to last week’s discussion of the iPad Pro, special guest John Livingston returns to discuss using the device for video entertainment. Joshua follows up on the Logitech Create keyboard case, explaining that it’s not working out for him as well as he’d hoped.

And in review, I talk about the newest MacBook (early 2015 12"). It’s become my primary Mac since the second week of February. While it’s obviously underpowered and lacking a number of handy ports, I’ve found that it impressively handles all of my needs. Listen to the show for details.


Joshua Peiffer, my cohost, was experiencing technical difficulties when it came time to record Thursday, so we were delayed a day.

Then, last night, I posted the show on our Squarespace site as usual. But as it turns out, I used special characters that aren’t allowed in a podcast’s upload to iTunes. I replaced last night’s copy with a new one today so that subscribers will receive the show in their podcast player of choice.

My apologies for any confusion or inconvenience this might have caused.